Tag Archives: blogging

The many aspects of research


Two themes that seemed to continue to show up in the Field/Action Research were the importance of secondary research and ethics. The talk mostly explored instances of primary research where students were interacting with subjects to gather information. However, all the Professors emphasized the importance of doing secondary research as well if not before primary research. I know Professor Searles spoke in detail about the importance of ethics. Ethics is the basis of every research project. There has to be a certain level of trust between a subject being interviewed and the people interviewing. If this ethical code is not formulated, there is no real basis for a relationship. This especially rang true for the adult entertainment shop project that Professor Searles spoke about.

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The Graduate: five years later


When I was a junior in high school, I wrote an eighteen-page research paper on The Graduate and must have watched the film twenty times, meticulously taking notes, doing research and thinking deeply. I went through the entire movie and would pause the movie every few seconds to write down something on a notecard. I think even my teacher would agree that I went a bit overboard with the whole thing, but I was intrigued by the concept of the film, the time period it sought to depict and the music it chose to use. Below is my concluding paragraph of that research paper.

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The Limits of your life


During his visit to Bucknell, Ta-Nehisi Coates answered a question from a student in the audience. The student asked Coates what people could do to make a change in the world? He was specifically speaking about racism in the United States. In response to the question, Coates spoke about how people like Martin Luther King Jr. existed within a history. In history there has to be a motive or something that we cannot ignore. On an individual level, Coates said that a person should find something that he loves that makes an impact on the world or at least something that matters. Coates said that people should be prepared to accept the limits of their lives. He meant that most people would not be able to change the world. The most important thing was for a person to do what he had to do in order to be at peace with him.

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Parody, Fair Use of Copyright Infringement?


The Campus Theater showed Spaceballs earlier tonight. It is a parody of the original Star Wars Parody. People tend to have polar opinions on parodies, but I am a big fan of them, especially movie parodies. Parodies are merely a form of satire. They imitate “works of art” by deliberately exaggerating them mainly for the purpose of comedy. But is this fair use? or is it a Copyright Infringement?

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Winter, Spring, Summer or Fall


Millennials have been “blessed” with being born into a generation that has technology and convenience at their fingertips. We do not have to leave a day at the end of finishing our papers, so that we can make sure we have enough time to type our final version out on a type writer. We have the gift of information at our fingertips. Wherever we are we are able to pull out our smartphones and google something. Our generation also has the luxury of communicating through text messages, emails, group messaging applications and many other newer mediums.

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growing up just the right amount


In a New York Times article about him, Shane Smith, CEO and co-founder of Vice Media, was quoted, saying he wanted to be just like Tom Freston, “Tom Just flies around everywhere, gets to make movies, gets to start TV shows, hang out with cool people and do whatever he wants.” Tom Freston was a top executive at Viacom and was instrumental in the success of MTV and is now an advisor to Vice. Just like Shane Smith, I want to be just like Tom, and since Shane Smith is now just like Tom, I want to be just like Shane Smith for the same reasons he wants to be just like Tom.

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Sup Bill?


I love the Cosby Show. Growing up, it was what I watched when I was sick, sad or bored. The Huxtables were part of the village that raised me. And, of course, at the center was the jello-loving, sweater-wearing, family-man, Bill Cosby.

High school hit, and I got really into stand-up. The reliance on words, the simplicity of one person a mike and a stage, and of course it was hilarious. Through stand-up, I reconnected with Bill. His style was like no one else’s. Bill performed sitting down. He doesn’t curse. Most of his comedy relies on observational humor and morality. He’s incredibly quick-witted. He broke form. And it worked.

So when it came to rape accusations, I kept my head in the sand.

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Enjoy your Meal Mrs. Miller!


When I was in third grade, we would start off every math class with what was called a “white board challenge.” We would all have little personal dry erase boards, and our teacher, Mrs. Miller, asked a few simple math questions that we would answer on our white boards. Our answers weren’t really graded per say (do third graders even get grades?), but she would make a point of walking around the room to look at who was getting the answers right and who was getting them wrong. Now I was by no means a math genius, not even by third grade standards. I’d consider myself to be in the middle of the pack- not showing off, not falling behind. I always enjoyed the white board challenges regardless, partially because white boards were fun to play with as a third grader (or maybe I just matured late), and partly because it made math… well not fun, but certainly more bearable. Unfortunately, after an incident occurring only a few months into the school year that all changed.  Continue reading Enjoy your Meal Mrs. Miller!