Tag Archives: communication

Communication as an Action Plan


I was unfortunately only able to attend the closing ceremony/panel of the sustainability symposium, where the main topic of the conversation was: How do we keep the enthusiasm created in this symposium and carry it to the future?

I have participated and leaded several conferences when I was in high school and I understand how excited people are about action plans making an exhaustive list of what to do next within the last sessions, but almost all the times not even half of the things on that list is accomplished by the next years conference. Why is that? Because the enthusiasm of the people decay very quickly, and therefore they don’t start their action plans until right before the next conference, which is too late to accomplish any goal that was initially put on the list.

The main solution that was suggested by students and professors was: BETTER COMMUNICATION. From their point of view of the people participating in the panel, if the different schools that participated in the symposium somehow find a way of communication, kept in touch and informed each other about all the projects they are doing, then the enthusiasm wouldn’t be lost. A lot of people suggested different ideas about how to communicate, and one person was taking exhaustive notes again in order to implement this communication action plan.

Sustaining communication is also a big effort and needs enough enthusiasm for people to follow through with it. Creating communication is easy, we live in a very social world with tools such as social media, ability to conduct video conferences etc., but since as the enthusiasm decays, communication also decays, so the main question here is: how to we sustain the communication?

Just Put It Down


Our world has never been more connected than it is today. Our generation is blessed with the ability to instantly contact anyone, retrieve information, or share an experience with the world. With this power has come immense progress in terms of healthcare, productivity, and professional networking (to name a few). What it has taken away, however, might be far more valuable. In my opinion, Millennials are losing the art of conversation. While our online personalities have never been more groomed, our inter-personal skills are at an all time low. Too often is a great moment spoiled by someone trying to take a picture or send a tweet. Rather than rely on our phones to define our lives, I think that improving the way we relate to one another in person can solve many of the large issues we face today. Continue reading Just Put It Down