Tag Archives: film

The Graduate: five years later


When I was a junior in high school, I wrote an eighteen-page research paper on The Graduate and must have watched the film twenty times, meticulously taking notes, doing research and thinking deeply. I went through the entire movie and would pause the movie every few seconds to write down something on a notecard. I think even my teacher would agree that I went a bit overboard with the whole thing, but I was intrigued by the concept of the film, the time period it sought to depict and the music it chose to use. Below is my concluding paragraph of that research paper.

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“And here’s to you, Mrs. Robinson”


The Graduate

This film was shown at the Campus Theater on Tuesday, April 28 at 7pm and was free to Bucknell students. I was intrigued by the film’s title, which implied the movie would be incredibly relevant to me, and went with Aylin to the showing. However, what I experienced was far from what I expected. Continue reading “And here’s to you, Mrs. Robinson”

Losing Ground


The film Losing Ground by Kathleen Collins featured a philosophy professor, Sara, and her painter husband, Victor. This art event was interesting because it touched on topics such as gender, race, and art. Sara was focused on writing a paper on aesthetic experience while her husband was focused on sketching and painting after he sold one of his pieces to a museum. I found it interesting to see the shift in Victor’s artwork from the beginning of the movie to the end and how his environment influenced his work. At first he painted abstract works of art in an apartment in the city. Then, Sara and Victor decided to move to a village for the summer. After moving, Victor became mesmerized by the Puerto Rican women, scenery, and lighting. He started to paint people as opposed to just utilizing colors and shapes and focusing on the medium of the work of art. Sara and Victor’s relationship was impacted by the shift in art and the change in environment. Sara did not understand why Victor was no longer painting in the same style after a museum bought one of his works. Victor became so intrigued by the content he was painting that he ended up focusing on his subject matter, a Puerto Rican woman, Celia, as opposed to his wife Sara.

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The Revelations of Comedy: Duck Soup at the Campus Theater


Earlier this semester, the short days and the cold weather was starting to wear on my attitude. Luckily, Provost Mick Smyer chose to feature Duck Soup (1933) at the Campus Theater and the goofiness of the comedy genuinely helped life my spirits. Smyer’s introduction to the movie praised the efforts of the Campus Theater staff for working so hard to bring in old movies from the country’s many film collections. He also made a point of noting the power of comedy and how it is a useful tool for seeing the absurdity of our world. Continue reading The Revelations of Comedy: Duck Soup at the Campus Theater