Tag Archives: pop culture

Blog Council Pop Culture Profundity


Great job this week! Rachel, Robbie, Ben, and Jordi really enjoyed discussing the posts.

First, some compliments:

  • Good job taking in the feedback from last week by improving your titles and generating some really great discussions through your comments
  • Great job adding multimedia to your blog posts
  • Blogs this week were engaging and did a great job of generating conversation
  • Overall, really creative use of examples from pop-culture and how they intersect with our class discussions

Now, some feedback and food for thought:

  • We thought that the class did a really good job of writing about topics that interested them and this showed. However, we think that posts could have benefited with a more clear connection to the class throughout the blog post (as opposed to only at the end). We think this could have been accomplished with use of a thesis statement at the introduction.
  • We were hoping for a broader selection of prompt topics by the class: lots of people posted about TV shows, but  no one wrote about music or books. Try to view some of your classmates posts before creating your own so we generate a diverse range of topics in the future.
  • The posts this week generated some really interesting discussion on plot-spoilers: the ethics of plot spoiling, when is it ok or not ok to discuss a plot line. What do you guys think about the ethics of plot spoiling? Consider tv shows vs. movies, Dramas vs Comedies.

Wall of Fame:

Our favorite  posts:

 

  • Our favorite titles:

 

Our favorite use of multimedia:

 

Most engaging comments:

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Family & Friends or Public?


Grey’s Anatomy is a renowned American medical drama series that premieres on ABC is about various challenges the characters face in terms of personal and medical decisions. The encounters the characters face test their moral beliefs and values as they choose between the lively hood of their patients and career to become surgeons. The ongoing show focuses around a few major characters, but today I will be talking about four of them: Meredith Grey, Derek Shepard, Richard Webber, and Alex Karev. Dr. Webber is the Chief of Surgery at Seattle Grace Hospital along with Dr. Shepard as an attending who oversees the residents, Dr. Grey and Dr. Karev, who have become close friends over the course of their residency. This show displays numerous moments of internal conflict based on the oath they have sworn to as doctors.

SPOILER ALERT:

Continue reading Family & Friends or Public?

Government 101: Ron Swanson


“Why government matters? It doesn’t” – Ron Swanson

Ron Swanson is the Director or the Parks and Recreation Department of Pawnee, Indiana, in the TV Show Parks and Recreation. In a perfect world you probably wouldn’t expect a government official to say that the work he is doing is basically pointless and useless. Well, Ron Swanson is not your ordinary government official… He is a hard-core libertarian who thinks that anything government related should be privatized and he is not afraid of expressing his demise against the government by quotes like “It’s never too early to learn that the government is a greedy piglet that suckles on a taxpayer’s teet until they have sore, chapped nipples”. Yet, as a government official his paycheck comes directly from taxpayer’s money, and he still continues his job.   Continue reading Government 101: Ron Swanson

Living a Lie


Psych is a show that follows the adventures of Shawn Spencer, the son of a former cop, who has keen observation and deduction skills that he uses to help the Santa Barbara police department solve crimes. Since he was a young boy, his father would meticulously test him to sharpen his detective skills. Although Shawn’s detective skills are almost unbeatable, they are unmatched against his devotion to having fun, until he learned to combine the two.

Originally Shawn would call in tips to the police hotline when he solved one of their cases by watching the daily news on TV, but one of his tips leads him to being brought in to the police department. Continue reading Living a Lie

House of Cards: Hint of Truth?


Like millions of other Americans, I’m a pretty big House of Cards fan. With the next season being released in just a few hours, I figured I’d take the time to incorporate some relevant aspects of the show into topics we frequently discuss. Before I get started, I’m well a ware that House of Cards is very unrealistic fiction. However, it’s got to be a gross, gross exaggeration on some element of truth. A few weeks ago, we took an in depth look at Enron and all the ethically questionable aspects of the business. What stood out to me was the relationship between Ken Lay, founder and CEO of Enron, with the Bush administration. Not only did he make massive contributions, but he was also co-chairman of Bush’s re-election committee and even on Dick Cheney’s list of industry advisors. This questionable relationship led to the deregulation of the energy market on a federal level, which Enron could take advantage of.  Continue reading House of Cards: Hint of Truth?

Serial Killers or America: who is more insane?


In American Psycho, Christian Bale plays Patrick Bateman, a vice president at a prominent investment bank. In the beginning of the film, we see Bateman going through his morning routine which involves a excessive maintenance regimen. He uses an ice pack to get rid of puffy eyes and nine separate cosmetic products before explaining “there is an idea of a Patrick Bateman…but there is no real me…I simply am not there” (American Psycho). We later learn that while Bateman is a businessman by day, he is a sociopathic serial killer by night.

*Warning: this post contains spoilers!*
Continue reading Serial Killers or America: who is more insane?

Lessons in Business from South Park


South Park is a well-known comedy program on Comedy Central intended for mature audiences. The creators of South Park, Matt Stone and Trey Parker, use dark humor, crude language, and a wide-variety of satire in their show which is based off of the adventures of four fourth grade boys who live in a small Colorado town called South Park.

Stone and Parker take pride in their fearlessness to poke fun at any sort of popular topic whether it is a person, place, organization, religion, etc. They have invited disapproval and sometimes courses of legal action from countless entities including the Church of Scientology, the NCAA, the Roman Catholic Church, Canada, Tom Cruise, Martha Stewart, PETA, and the list goes on.

Episode 09 of season 08 is titled “Something Wall Mart This Way Comes.” The “target” of this episode is not surprisingly the multinational retail giant, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Stone and Parker have done multiple episodes about corporate America including taking the pro-corporation stance in Season 02, which is controversial considering their studio is located in the overwhelmingly anti-corporation area of Hollywood, California. This episode, however, shows the giant retailer in a more negative light.

The episode begins with excited anticipation from South Park’s citizens as their new Wall Mart is about to open for business. One character says, “It’s like we’re a real town now.” I find this to be one of the most truthful lines of the episode. I have personally measured a town’s “relativity” by how far away they are from the nearest Wal-Mart. I spent my summer playing baseball in a very small town in upstate New York. The town is literally called Boonville. Their nearest Wal-Mart was about 40 miles away which is the first example I would use when trying to convey the middle-of-nowhere-ness to other people.

Continuing with the episode, the people of South Park cannot stop shopping at Wall Mart because of its incredible bargains. One character boasts about having, “Enough bulk Ramen to last 1,000 winters.” One of the boys, Stan Marsh, asks his father, Randy, how Wall Mart is able to sell things for much less than South Park’s local stores. Randy replies, “It’s simple economics son, I don’t understand it at all.” This symbolizes how the average American consumer really does not understand the ins and outs of the corporations at which they shop every day.

Eventually the main street in South Park becomes a ghost-town. All of the local businesses have been forced to close because they cannot compete with the low prices of Wall Mart. The people of South Park, although hopelessly addicted to shopping at the Wall Mart which is now being portrayed with dark, ominous clouds and flashes of lightning combined with typical evil-sounding music, realize that the store needs to be stopped. They have a town meeting and agree to discontinue shopping at Wall Mart; however they cannot resist the calling of wondrous bargains from the Wall Mart which has seemed to develop its own eerie persona. Follow the link to view the clip from the episode to see how the people of South Park just cannot resist shopping at Wall Mart (could not embed video).

“Well where else was I supposed to get a napkin dispenser at 9:30 at night?” This line perfectly sums up how people think of Wal-Mart as well as how Wal-Mart wants to be thought of by people. After the town burns down the Wall Mart, another one is rebuilt and opened the very next day. The boys are determined to stop the powerful retailer and embark on an adventure to Wall Mart’s headquarters in Arkansas. Meanwhile, Randy quit his job as a geologist to become a store clerk at Wall Mart in order to receive the 10% employee discount.

The boys learn from a disheveled and regretful Wall Mart President that only way the Wall Mart can be stopped is to destroy its heart. Many have attempted this feat but no one has ever been able to restrain themselves from the amazing deals long enough to accomplish the task. Determined more than ever, the boys set out to destroy the Wall Mart in South Park. In their journey to find the heart of Wall Mart, they are ambushed with slashed prices and unbelievable deals. Miraculously, the boys find the location of the heart which is just past a huge sale for plasma screen TVs. In a dramatic unveiling process, it is revealed that the heart of the Wall Mart is simply a mirror. The true heart of the Wall Mart is the consumer. It is desire. The Wall Mart can take many forms, whether it be Target, K-mart, or even Amazon, but it is the consumer who ultimately breaths life into the giant retailer.

The message(s) in this episode could not be clearer. Many people do not support large corporations like Wal-Mart because they force smaller local shops out of business. But Wal-Mart could not have become the super power that it is without the average consumer. If they have grown from one store to become the largest retailer in the world, and people continue to flood the store, then they must be doing something right. After all, the true heart of Wal-Mart is the consumer. Their goal is not to bankrupt small businesses across the country. They simply give the consumer what they want which is an opportunity to consume while also being able to stretch their income. At the end of the episode, Randy says, “The Wall Mart is us. If we like our small-town charm more than the big corporate bullies, we all have to be willing to pay a little bit more.” This is essentially a play on Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand as the town is not suggesting government intervention; rather they suggest letting the free market system work and guide itself.

If you are like me and enjoy comedic satire then I strongly suggest watching this episode of South Park if you have not already. For another take on American capitalism, I suggest “Gnomes” which is season 02 episode 17. In this episode, Stone and Parker defend capitalism when a large coffee chain called Harbucks enters the town and threatens to put the local Tweak Bros. coffee shop out of business. For more on the actual application of South Park lessons, visit this link which is an article written by Paul A. Cantor, an English professor at the University of Virginia, who uses South Park in his lectures.

The clip from the episode can be found here

The featured image can be found here

Here is an actual embedded clip (Jordi)

Pop-Culture Profundity- Blog 4


For your next blog post (#4), the idea is to use the blog to have some fun, probe how popular culture (TV, film, comics, music, books, video games, and so on) reflect issues relevant to our class such as ethics, business, power, politics, and the like.

One of my classes last year did a similar theme, but more focused on TV.  You can see that BC report here.  Or, a later one here (BGS 4):

You have a lot of latitude.

Before you hit “PUBLISH:”

1) Proofread

2) Get a featured image (and source it in post)

3) Add a mulitmedia clip.  many, like youtube or vivo can be embedded in your post.  Video help.  Audio help.

4) From now on, when you READ posts, RATE THEM using the star voting.  Try to give only 1-2 5-stars a week.

5) Try adding a poll if you want like I did.  Click “add poll” when composing prompt.

Featured image from Daily Californian

Zombies Are Not Dead…


Cover of "Dawn of the Dead [Blu-ray]"

The first R-Rated movie I saw (or recall seeing) was the original Dawn of the Dead.  I was 12 or so and I was definitely getting away with something by getting a friend’s older brother to rent it for us (on VHS tape) from the corner video store.

I think one’s first R- film makes an impact.  What was yours? (add to comments!) Continue reading Zombies Are Not Dead…