Tag Archives: social responsibility

The Case for the Ethical Burrito: A Kantian Perspective on Advertisement


Chipotle and the Ethical Burrito

Chipotle opened its first store in 1993 and has seen astonishing growth and financial success since going public in 2006. Chipotle has been one of the industry’s leaders in serving sustainable food. It is trying to change the way people think about and eat fast-food. It has recently been marketing its commitment to serving high-quality and sustainable ingredients through various media outlets and programs. Despite being considered an industry leader in sustainability, Chipotle’s advertisement and practices have been criticized for being unethical and misleading to customers. The ethics of its advertisement and practices have been questioned, but nevertheless, Chipotle is shining the necessary light into the problems of the farming and agriculture industry. Chipotle is making consumers more aware and conscious about what they are eating. Even if not all of Chipotles practices are completely ethical or sustainable, it is setting an example that other companies in the industry can follow.

Continue reading The Case for the Ethical Burrito: A Kantian Perspective on Advertisement

Bakers on a Mission: Greyston Bakery


“We don’t hire people to bake brownies; we bake brownies to hire people.” –Greyston 

She is left Haiti as a child at the age of 11 and became a homeless teenage mother at 14. Her pregnancy influenced her to leave school and not pursue any further education. She applied for employment, but unfortunately was turned away and told to keep in touch. She was persistent and got in touch daily, which landed her a one-week opportunity. Now, Dieulane Philogene works in accounting at Greyston Bakery with a stable home for herself and two children. She took ownership in paving her own path.

In our society finding employment is difficult enough alone, but even more difficult for those who have little to no work experience and histories of homelessness, incarceration, substance abuse, and/or illiteracy. The media frequently portrays people, like Dieulane Philogene, who have these past histories as lazy, dependent, alcoholics and drug abusers. Continue reading Bakers on a Mission: Greyston Bakery

2.3 Miles Makes a Giant Difference


Fortune 500 and nationally-known companies are not the only ones who face ethical dilemmas in their decisions. Smaller and lesser-known companies also grapple with the ethical implications of both their day-day and long-term decision-making. In my Paper 2, I will take a look at the strategic decisions behind local grocery store chain, Giant Foods. In this blog post I will give a summarized version of the case and a glossed over version of the results (sort of spoiler alert but not really). Fortunately for me, my dad has a management position in Giant, so most of the information in this post is from using him as a source.

On October 10, 2014, Giant Foods opened its new store located just off of I-81 and Wertzville Road in Enola, Pennsylvania.  A few weeks previous, Giant closed its long-time successful store 2.3 miles away on Wertzville Road located in Pennsboro Commons Shopping Center.

Giant has owned the leasing rights to the land for the new store for ten years.  Approximately three years ago, the real estate developer for the land told Giant that they must do something to develop the land or else they would not be able to renew their lease for the 25-30 acre plot.  Giant was only holding the land to prevent competitors like Wegmans from entering the market, but now they were faced with a difficult decision. It was clear that Giant needed to build a new store on this plot of land, but what should they do with the existing Enola store?

Closing the old Enola store would be a significant blow to the community. That store is the heart of Pennsboro Commons, a shopping center that only exists because of the large number of customers in which Giant brings. The 2.3 miles to the new Giant would be a way bigger issue than most would think. The communities between these two areas are very different, and even more importantly, while the new Giant was technically still in Enola, it now resided in Hampden Township as opposed to the old store which was in East Pennsboro Township.  This was a major loss of tax dollars for East Pennsboro Township.

Giant’s accounting and real estate teams crunched the numbers of their ROI figures and determined that opening a new store at the new location would increase sales because they would have a new facility, closer location to the highway, and closer vicinity to the technology parkway (new local medical and corporate centers).  They also determined that there was no way to keep both stores open; especially since the majority of existing customers would simple drive 2.3 miles to the new store. Spoiler: They were wrong. Old customers were not willing to travel to the new store, and the new customers did not care for the new store. Sales figures missed projections badly (stay tuned for exact figures in Paper 2).

Giant was fully aware of the negative implications that closing the old store would have on East Pennsboro Township. They could have tried to make a compromising plan to appease the community but instead they went with the plan for most profit. Ironically, the strategy did not go as planned and Giant is left with an angry community and a less profitable store. Below are pictures from Google Images of the Pennsboro Commons shopping center layout and a picture of what the parking lot looks like before and after Giant closed its doors.

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“We don’t hire people to bake brownies, we bake brownies to hire people.”


Heather Van Dusen, who is the director of  “B-Corps Fellows Program” and the “B-Corps on Campus initiative,” spoke about B-Corps certification and one example she showed was Greyston Bakery, Inc., which interested me and made me want to learn more about the company. Greyston in Yonkers, New York is a for-profit social enterprise that bakes brownies and cookies with a good will. They are famously known as Ben & Jerry’s brownie supplier, which we can say are tasty. Greyston Bakery is a company that has become B-Corp certified and scored a 147/200 on their impact assessment based on their contribution towards social, environmental, and economic sustainability. Continue reading “We don’t hire people to bake brownies, we bake brownies to hire people.”

Whose fault is it anyways?


Cheesecake Factory: a well-known chain restaurant we all know that is usually connected to a mall. We all enjoy their cheesecake and their large portioned entrees. Cheesecake Factory provides their waiters and waitresses with good benefits like health insurance and service to their immediate families, which are uncommon in this field. Fortune ranked Cheesecake Factory Incorporated number 88 out of 100 Best Companies to Work For. Servers have the ability to earn $42,455 a year with benefits makes it a place severs enjoy the benefits of working there. These benefits are not normally offered to individuals who work as severs in other restaurants. But are employees allowing the benefits of the company to blind their judgment upon Cheesecake Factory’s social responsibility and supply chain. Continue reading Whose fault is it anyways?