Tag Archives: white paper

Tourism: The Negative Impacts of Travel and the Future of the Service Industry


From climbing to the top of the Eiffel Tower and overlooking the city of Paris to walking through the amphitheater of Rome’s Colosseum, the world’s various historical landmarks and architectural masterpieces provide society with a great amount of places to explore. These attractions create an opportunity for families to travel and experience a new culture. In recent years, the amount of tourism has increased tremendously. In order to determine what factors influenced the increase in tourism, I reviewed statistical evidence in regards to population growth, information on marketing and mass media, and the hospitality industry. The world population has significantly increased and is predicted to reach high numbers that overwhelm Earth’s resources. Marketing and mass media has generated a halo effect on consumers. In other words, advertising campaigns have been proven to influence how people view certain destinations and can impact whether or not they travel to a specific area. Lastly, the hospitality industry has expanded rapidly due to globalization. The expansion of the service industry has provided more of an opportunity for society to travel around the globe.

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Why ALEC Needs to Change: A Message to the IRS


Since the formation of the United States constitution, lobbying has been a vital part of our political system. The rise of the interest group has helped fill in gaps in representation of diverse interests in ways that the system of party politics cannot. However, there is one group that bypasses this organized system of interest group lobbying. The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) takes the corporate entity and places them on the fast-track. Under ALEC, members of the private and public sector co-draft model legislation, which is then paid for by state legislatures and passed into law. There is no other nonprofit organization like them in American politics today.

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Solving the Real Problems of the Homeless


Growing up in a suburb of our nation’s capital, I experienced the homeless nearly every day. My hometown city made Money Magazine’s list of the “100 Best Places to Live” in the U.S.,[1] yet homeless individuals asked my bus driver for money each day on my ride to and from school. How has the richest country on earth continued to allow such public misery, even on the streets of, and near, the very city that is supposed to create policy to help these homeless individuals? Continue reading Solving the Real Problems of the Homeless

“You Never Give Me Your Money, You Only Give Me Your Funny Paper”: A Case for the Revision of Internet Radio’s Compensation Practices


Four papers and hours of Pandora and Spotify later, finals week is over. For all of the time I spent listening to music for free through Internet streaming services, the artists who helped me through a tough week are receiving mere cents from me and the digital music streaming services I’ve used.

The current copyright regulations governing the music industry haven’t been updated since 2001. Since then,  the iPod has debuted, parents use “iPad time” to incentivize their toddlers to use the toilet, flip phones are a rarity, and Spotify and Pandora exist. The drastic changes in technology have resulted in patterns of consumption that allow consumers to pick and choose songs instead of buying entire albums, and listen to stream music through numerous devices for free. Despite the shifts in revenue streams, the policies governing the compensation of songwriters, composers, and other creatives have not. These creative forces driving the music industry are facing unfair compensation from these new services, a problem that has the potential to bring down the entire industry. Was Taylor Swift on to something?

Mary Morris White Paper

Feature Image: http://beatlessongwriting.blogspot.com/p/tickets-to-write.html

LEARNING TO LOVE MASS TRANSIT IN A CAR OBSESSESD SOCIETY


Our society’s modern mobility started off with public transportation in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Urban and intercity railways became the regular mode of transportation for the growing middle class. The twentieth century was when investments in the improvements of roads increased allowing motor buses to serve less affluent and smaller communities off of main routes. Continue reading LEARNING TO LOVE MASS TRANSIT IN A CAR OBSESSESD SOCIETY